Online Exhibits

With the support of the Virtual Museum of Canada‘s Community Memories Project, the Port Moody Heritage Society has created the following online photo exhibits about Port Moody’s history.

Port Moody Lumber Mills

Flavelle Mill Green Line

Flavelle Mill Green Line

Port Moody boomed when the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) selected the town as the western terminus in the late 1800s. Lumber was in demand for wharves, round houses, bunkhouses, storehouses as well as millions of railway ties, bridges, and trestles.  However, when the CPR announced that the railway would be extended to Vancouver many left Port Moody. Port Moody and it’s lumber industry were saved when several new sawmills and shingle mills began operating near Burrard Inlet, providing hundreds of jobs and attracting new residents to the area.
Enter the Virtual Museum of Canada site hosting Lumber Mills of Port Moody.

Port Moody May Days

Port Moody May Queen

Port Moody May Queen

Originally the ancient Roman celebration “Floralia,” May Day became a custom when the province of British Columbia was colonized, but the occasion was honoured with unprecedented enthusiasm in Port Moody from 1930 to 1972. With May Queens and parades, Port Moody’s May Day was a sight to see.

Enter the Virtual Museum of Canada site hosting Port Moody May Days.

Schools of Port Moody

Port Moody School

Port Moody School

“Schools of Port Moody” chronicles the history of the buildings used for education in Port Moody, British Columbia from 1883 to 1973 and includes some of the students and teachers that attended them.

Enter the Virtual Museum of Canada site hosting School Days of Port Moody.

Ioco: Life in a Company Town

Ioco, BC Town

Ioco, BC Town

The Imperial Oil Company built an oil refinery in 1914 on the north shore of Burrard Inlet, across the way from Port Moody, BC. Initially isolated, the Company decided to built a town adjacent to the refinery in 1921. Known as Ioco, the town was a haven for Imperial Oil employees and their families until the 1970s. By the late 1920s, Ioco had developed into a thriving community consisting of 83 homes, 2 churches, a school, community hall, lawn bowling green, baseball diamond, tennis courts, and horseshoe pitch.

Enter the Virtual Museum of Canada site hosting Ioco: Life in a Company Town.

The Port of Port Moody

Baird's Tug Boat Myn Best


Port Moody’s port was very important for the development of the city. Named after Royal Engineer commander, Col Richard C. Moody, Port Moody provided an ice-free defensive harbour for the new capital of the Colony of British Columbia. In its early days, Port Moody provided port services to the Canadian Pacific Railroad and later for a variety of lumber mills and oil refineries. Throughout its life, tug boats and barges have been a staple on the waters at the end of Burrard Inlet. Today, bulk loading is still conducted in Port Moody by Pacific Coast Terminals and the Inlet is used by a wide variety of recreational vessels.

Enter the Virtual Museum of Canada site hosting The Port of Port Moody.