The Station Museum Goes to Tri Cities VolunteerFest

Tri Cities VolunteerFest

This weekend the Port Moody Station Museum was at the Tri-Cities VolunteerFest at Coquitlam Centre. It was a fantastic event put on by Community Volunteer Connections, where we and other local organizations had the opportunity to meet enthusiastic people looking to give back to the community. We also got to chat with Coquitlam’s mayor Richard Stewart and MP Finn Donnelly. Thanks to CVC for allowing us to connect with so many great new volunteers!

Facebook Links the Station Museum with its Visitors and Community

facebook

We’re concerned with history here at the Museum, but we’re also dedicated to being active in our community and providing the best possible service to our visitors. In order to do that, we must make sure we keep up with modern ways of communicating – the telegraph just doesn’t cut it in the 21st century.

Our facebook page is a great way for us to update our visitors and community on what we’re doing here at the Museum. We can share events, photos, and details of what we’re up to day-to-day. We can also keep track of other events going on in our community.

Most importantly, our facebook page gives us the chance to hear back from our “fans” – who range from regular visitors and volunteers to those too far away to visit us – about how we’re doing and what matters to them. We love being able to stay in touch with those who aren’t around all the time, and to branch out to new visitors, volunteers, and community members.

Visit our facebook page and “Like” us to get invitations to our events, information on what’s happening at the Museum, and an opportunity to ask questions or tell us what you think.

Notable Stories Teaser

The Hexapus

Staff at the museum are writing a history book on Port Moody which will be released Fall 2012! It will tell the tale of the city through a large collection of photographs and vibrant stories. Here’s an example of one of the “notable stories” you can read about in the book.

The Hexapus

The Hexapus
On his way home from school one day, Bill Baird, son of the owner of Baird Tugs, “saw something strange”.  Just before reaching his house, he noticed a creature lying in the mud flats, west of where the old wharf used to be located, at Queen Street. The tide was out, and clinging to one of the visible boom sticks planted in the ground was an unidentifiable animal, “the colour of a pair of socks”.  Bill got out his slingshot and, with a friend, shot a couple of rocks over the creature’s head. With every shot the creature’s tentacles splayed out in response, revealing itself as an octopus. The boys, in typical fashion, scrambled for their dinghy, loading as many tools as fast as they could, and rowed out to capture it. On the dock, they measured the octopus at 8 feet, 4 inches long, and noticed two of its tentacles were missing. After making some inquiries, they were told a curious tale.

Log Booms on Burrard Inlet

Several weeks before, and several miles west at a sawmill, “a chap had fallen off the dock” and into the murky water. The man was immediately seized by an octopus and dragged further under. Luckily he had a knife in his belt, and managed to cut off two of the creature’s arms before swimming to safety. The boys knew their catch must be the same octopus, and so strung it up on a clothesline and charged each town resident ten cents to take a look. One man was even brave enough to touch a tentacle, and was rewarded with a struggle, as he had to pry a still deadly suction cup off his hand. After their show was over, Bill Baird and his friend were approached by a group of Japanese families, who paid the boys five dollars for the delicacy.

Look out for this and more when the book is finished! Have your own stories or photos to contribute? Email us at info@portmoodymuseum.org.

 

 

 

This project sponsored by

 

Museum Staff Take to the Water

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To celebrate the last few weeks of the summer students’ jobs, the staff of the Port Moody Station Museum took to the water for a new perspective on Port Moody’s history. Thanks to Jamie and his staff at Rocky Point Kayak, we spent a morning exploring Port Moody from Burrard Inlet.

Laurel and Bronwen practicing on dry land

Setting out from Rocky Point, we started our trip by visiting the seals and their pups on the log booms as we passed the Flavelle Mill.

 

A mother seal and her pup

We paddled along the south shore until we reached Reed Point Marina, passing the site of the first CPR station in Port Moody along the way. After crossing over to the north shore of the inlet, we paddled past the old Ioco refinery and the Ioco town site – very important parts of Port Moody’s past and present.

 

Jim working hard while Rebecca stops to take pictures

All along the way we had beautiful views of the mountains and the water, saw plenty of wildlife (seals, herons, cormorants, and even sea lions!), and had a great time paddling, splashing, and laughing.

 

Matt in his sombrero

 

Devon paddling like a pro

ELSA Programs at the Station Museum

An ESLA class at the Station Museum

ELSA (English Language Services for Adults) classes have been discovering local heritage and history at the Port Moody Station Museum this summer. Each program has been designed to suit differing levels of English knowledge and understanding.

Our Level 1-2 program, “Daily Life in the Home,” involves the identification of household objects and understanding of how each object relates to a daily activity undertaken in the home, such as laundry, childcare, or entertaining guests. Students get to explore the Museum and begin to get a sense of what Port Moody’s early residents’ lives may have been like.

“Community Services Then and Now” is our Level 2-3 program, which involves students learning what kinds of community services were important to Port Moody residents when the city was brand new. Students participate in a role-playing activity, some as vendors and service providers, and some as consumers. Each interaction requires students to practice vocabulary and skills such as making a purchase, giving or getting information, and conversing in English.

Our Level 3-4 program, “Transportation and Communication,” focuses on Port Moody Station’s role as a communication hub during its life as an operating CPR train station. Using maps, timetables, and advertisements from the past, students can plan a trip to a destination in Canada. Students also participate in a scavenger hunt around the Museum that shows different ways people communicated and traveled through Port Moody Station in the early 20th century.

We are currently seeking funding to create a Level 4/5 program. In the meantime, Level 4/5 classes are welcome to book a tour of the Museum, after which students have a chance to explore it as they fill out a worksheet that requires them to search for written and visual clues.

We can provide pre-visit resources to teachers before their visit to familiarize students with vocabulary they’ll encounter during the program. Programs are all about 90 minutes long, and cost $3.00 per person. To book a program or for more information, visit our website (http://portmoodymuseum.org/programs/home-school/), email info@portmoodymuseum.org, or call us at 604-939-1648.

An ESLA class at the Station Museum

Sealed-Bid Auction of J Peachy’s “The Station”

The Station
The Station

"The Station" by J Peachy

J Peachy is an artist, mental health advocate, radio host, comedian, and all-around great Canadian guy.  This month, he is helping raise money for the Port Moody Station Museum by donating 50% of the proceeds from a sealed-bid auction of his painting “The Station.”

In this sealed-bid auction, each bidder secretly bids without knowing how much others have offered for the painting, with a minimum bid of $50. The highest bid and the winner of the painting will be announced on July 3rd at the Museum during our 125th CPR Train Anniversary Celebration. All bidders will also be entered to win a random draw for a J Peachy print (valued at $30).

Bids can be sent in by email (to laurel@portmoodymuseum.org) or dropped off in person at the Museum, where the painting is on display daily from 10 am to 5 pm. Emails must contain your full name, email address, phone number, and your bid. The last bids will be accepted at 3:00 pm on July 3rd.

Your bid will help support the Museum and a local artist, and maybe add a beautiful new work of art to your collection!

J Peachy is an artist, mental health advocate, radio host, comedian, and all-around great Canadian guy. This month, he is helping raise money for the Port Moody Station Museum by donating 50% of the proceeds from a sealed-bid auction of his painting “The Station.”

In this sealed-bid auction, each bidder secretly bids without knowing how much others have offered for the painting, with a minimum bid of $50. The highest bid and the winner of the painting will be announced on July 3rd at the Museum during our 125th CPR train anniversary and Canada Day celebrations. All bidders will also be entered to win a random draw for a J Peachy print (valued at $30).

Bids can be sent in by email (to laurel@portmoodymuseum.org) or dropped off in person at the Museum, where the painting is on display daily from 10 am to 5 pm. Emails must contain your full name, email address, phone number, and your bid. The last bids will be accepted at 3:00 pm on July 3rd.

Heritage Actors Needed!

costumed girls
costumed girls

Costumed girls at Art For U Day

The Port Moody Station Museum needs enthusiastic and engaging young actors to volunteer at our 125th CPR Train Anniversary and Canada Day Celebrations! We are looking for thespians between 13 and 18 to take on roles as characters from 1886, when the first CPR passenger train arrived in Port Moody. Volunteers will circulate in small groups around the Museum grounds and at the Golden Spike Days Festival in Rocky Point Park on July 1st, 2nd, and 3rd from noon to 4pm.

Period costumes and a heritage acting workshop will be provided free to volunteers by Angela Brown. Volunteers must attend one of two workshops, Monday, June 6th or 27th from 3:30-5:30 at the Port Moody Station Museum, where Angela will teach 1880s-specific character acting and techniques for roving performances. Lunch will be provided to all volunteers.

To participate in this fun and educational experience or for more information, please contact Laurel or Rebecca at the Port Moody Station Museum: 604-939-1648 or info@portmoodymuseum.org.